Tree Nut Allergy

Whether you or your child have an allergy to one of the list of tree nuts, or to ALL of them, chances are you have been told to avoid them all.  A reason behind this is that so many are processed in the same facilities, making  cross contamination a real possibility. Tree nut allergies also tend to be  severe~ potentially causing anaphylaxis.

The Tree-nut forbidden list is a long one, including: Almonds [remember some lotions and shampoos use almond in them!], walnuts, filberts, hazelnuts [coffee, creamer] , pinenuts, pistachios, pralines, pecans, chestnuts, Brazil nuts,  Hickory nuts, and Shea nut [goodbye lotion!] to name a few.   Also included on the Forbidden list:  nut oils, marzipan [it’s made from almond paste], nougat, pesto, gianduja [nut mixture found in some chocolate], most chocolates and candies, including M&Ms, most bakery items-[cross contamination, and almond extract!] and of course, probably everything on the peanut list as well!!!  As a parent you will also have to consider the potential risk from natural setting nuts- like ACORNS! [I remember playing with them all the time as a child!]

Cashews are in the same family as mango and pistachio. “There has been some research to show a relationship between a cashew allergy and a severe reaction to poison ivy.”[allergicchild.com] So parents be aware!

Nutmeg is usually not included on the Nut list, however in my case, Caleb IS allergic to them. The best advice is to be tested for it if you are concerned.

Regarding Coconut: Some sources claim it as a nut, others do not.  From the FAAN website: “Should coconut be avoided by someone with a tree nut allergy? Discuss this with your doctor. Coconut, the seed of a drupaceous fruit, has typically not been restricted in the diets of people with tree nut allergy. However, in October of 2006, the FDA began identifying coconut as a tree nut. The available medical literature contains documentation of a small number of allergic reactions to coconut; most occurred in people who were not allergic to other tree nuts. Ask your doctor if you need to avoid coconut.” Yet the Allergic child website states “The coconut is in the palm family, and while it is possible to be allergic to coconut…it doesn’t cross react with tree nuts. Our son tolerates coconut without a problem. Yet coconut has been determined to be a tree nut by the FDA for purposes of labeling! Food that includes coconut will likely have a label stating that the product includes Tree Nuts.” ~ SO again, if you suspect an allergy, or if yo want to be sure- Get tested! and follow your Doctors advice on the subject.

Please note that Silk Soy Milk now contains food warning that they may contain Almond, and there have been reports of anaphylactic reactions from it!

For more information please check out the links below:

http://www.foodallergy.org/page/tree-nut-allergy

http://www.allergicchild.com/tree_nut_allergies.htm

http://blog.onespotallergy.com/2011/03/is-coconut-safe-for-people-with-tree-nut-allergies/

Another hidden allergen source is medications!~ please check http://www.avoidingmilkprotein.com/peascript.htm for a list of medications with nut contaminates.

Check this page too for a list of non-food products that are made from nuts, and shells- everything from paint, paper, gopher control, industrial products, cat litter, laundry detergent, etc!! http://www.avoidingmilkprotein.com/nutty.htm

There is a new product from Bluebuffalo.  Cat litter made with crushed walnuts… “BLUE Naturally Fresh™ Quick-Clumping Formula Superior odor control among leading clumping litters.
A proprietary blend of the fibrous materials found only in walnut shells that have been proven in laboratory tests to neutralize odor better than other brand clumping litters. Virtually NO dust. Unlike clay litter, which often throws off silica dust, BLUE Naturally Fresh is virtually dust-free so you and your cat can breathe easier!” Maybe, but anyone with a nut allergy is being put at incredible risk!~ Imagine sending your child to a friend’s house, where they use this, and their cat walks everywhere, spreading the nut residue? Nightmare! This adds an important question to ask when going to anyone’s house!

As an alternative to Peanut butter, both of these are good, and can be used for baking- Be careful about not cross contaminating if you still use actual peanut butter in your house; or if you use jelly at someone else’s house! [If you use PB first in the sandwich-then the jelly or fluff- those are now contaminated with peanut oil.]


Here is a link for a safe peanut and tree-nut allergen free candy and snack list [great for schools, parties, and holidays]: Candy List

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